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Haemophilus Influenzae Type B Vaccine

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by McCoy K

(Hib Vaccine)

 

What Is Hib Disease?

Haemophilus influenzae type B, or Hib, is a bacteria that can cause infections. It usually occurs in children under five years old. Hib can lead to:
People can carry Hib bacteria and not know it. These germs can spread from person to person. They usually spread through droplets from an infected person. Sickness will probably not occur when the germs stay in the nose and throat. They can cause serious problems when they spread into the lungs or the bloodstream.
Before the vaccine, severe Hib disease affected about 20,000 United States children under age five.
Symptoms include:
  • Fever
  • Drowsiness
  • Vomiting
  • Stiff neck
  • Other symptoms, depending on the part of the body affected
 


WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION?

Immunization
American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.cispimmunize.org

Vaccines & Immunizations
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines

 

References


Baker CJ, Pickerling LK, et al. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Recommended adult immunization schedule: United States, 2011. Ann Intern Med. 2011;154(3):168-173.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended immunization schedules for persons aged 0-18 years—United States, 2011. MMWR. 2011;60(5).


Type B (Hib) vaccine. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hib.html. Published December 16, 1998. Accessed November 29, 2012.


Vaccine information statements. Immunization Action Coalition website. Available at: http://www.immunize.org/vis/. Accessed November 29, 2012.


Vaccine safety and the importance of immunization. New York State Department of Health website. Available at: http://www.health.state.ny.us/prevention/immunization/recommendations/children.htm. Accessed November 29, 2012.


1/31/2008 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended immunization schedules for persons aged 0-18 years—United States, 2008. MMWR. 2008;57;Q1-Q4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MMWR website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5701a8.htm. Updated January 10, 2008. Accessed January 28, 2008.


9/25/2009 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Licensure of a haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine (Hiberix) and updated recommendations for use of Hib vaccine. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep . 2009;58:1008.


10/30/2009 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Prymula R, Siegrist C, et al. Effect of prophylactic paracetamol administration at time of vaccination on febrile reactions and antibody responses in children: two open-label, randomised controlled trials. Lancet. 2009;374(9698):1339.


2/10/2014 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Bridges C, Coyne-Beasley T. Advistory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended immunization schedules for adults aged 19 years or older: United States, 2014. Ann Intern Med. 2014;160(3):190-197.

 

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