Munson Health
 
Giving Acetaminophen to Your Child

Back to Document

by Kassir K
momandchild The doctor has prescribed a medication called acetaminophen for your child. Be sure that you read and understand the information below before giving your child this medication.

How Much Medication Do I Give?

Age
Weight
Total Dose You Need to Give Your Child
If using Children’s 80 mg tablet, you will need to give your child…
If using Junior 160 mg tablet, you will need to give your child…
2-3 years
24-35 pounds (11-16 kg)
160 mg
2 tablets
1 tablet**
4-5 years
36-47 pounds (16-21.5 kg)
240 mg
3 tablets
1 ½ tablets**
6-8 years
48-59 pounds (21.5-27 kg)
320 mg
4 tablets
2 tablets
9-10 years
60-71 pounds (27-32.5 kg)
400 mg
5 tablets
2 ½ tablets
11 years
72-95 pounds (32.5-43 kg)
480 mg
6 tablets
3 tablets
≥12 years
96+ pounds (43.5+ kg)
640 mg
n/a
4 tablets
Age
Weight
Total Dose You Need to Give Your Child
If using infant drops (80 mg/0.8ml), you will need to give your child…
If using liquid (160 mg/5ml), you will need to give your child…
0-3 months
6-11 pounds (2.7-5 kg)
40 mg
0.4 ml**
n/a
4-11 months
12-17 pounds (5-8 kg)
80 mg
0.8 ml**
½ teaspoon
(2.5 ml)**
12-23 months
18-23 pounds (8-11 kg)
120 mg
1.2 ml**
¾ teaspoon
(3.75 ml)**
2-3 years
24-35 pounds (11-16 kg)
160 mg
1.6 ml
1 teaspoon (5 ml)
4-5 years
36-47 pounds (16-21.5 kg)
240 mg
n/a
1 ½ teaspoons
(7.5 ml)
6-8 years
48-59 pounds (21.5-27 kg)
320 mg
n/a
2 teaspoons (10 ml)
9-10 years
60-71 pounds (27-32.5 kg)
400 mg
n/a
2 ½ teaspoons
(12.5 ml)
11 years
72-95 pounds (32.5-43 kg)
480 mg
n/a
3 teaspoons (15 ml)

How Should I Store This Medication?

Store the medication at room temperature (68°F-77°F [20°C-25°C]) in a place that is free from moisture and light. Make sure that the medication is locked up and not accessible to any children.

When Should I Call A Doctor?

Call the doctor if your child has:
  • Signs of a more serious allergic reaction:
    • Wheezing
    • Chest tightness
    • Fever
    • Itching
    • Bad cough
    • Blue skin color
    • Convulsions
    • Swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • New or worsening stomach pain
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Jaundice, a condition marked by yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • Rash
Also, call the doctor if your child feels worse or the condition does not improve.
If you think your child may have overdosed, go to the emergency room or call your local poison control center right away.
 

RESOURCES

American Pharmacists Association Foundation
http://www.aphafoundation.org

United States Food and Drug Administration
http://www.fda.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Pharmacists Association
http://www.pharmacists.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

 

References


Acetaminophen. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated June 24, 2013. Accessed September 27, 2013.


Acetaminophen poisoning. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated February 21, 2013. Accessed September 27, 2013.


Acetaminophen oral solution. DailyMed website. Available at: http://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/lookup.cfm?setid=2b8a640c-6859-42b3-a5dc-7a7d2a12816c. Updated May 2013. Accessed September 27, 2013.


Children’s dosage guide. Tylenol website. Available at: http://www.tylenol.com/children/subchild. Accessed September 27, 2013.

 

Revision Information