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Giving Acetaminophen to Your Child

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by Kassir K
momandchild The doctor has prescribed a medication called acetaminophen for your child. Be sure that you read and understand the information below before giving your child this medication.

How Much Medication Do I Give?

Age
Weight
Total Dose You Need to Give Your Child
If using Children’s 80 mg tablet , you will need to give your child…
If using Junior 160 mg tablet , you will need to give your child…
2-3 years
24-35 pounds (11-16 kg)
160 mg
2 tablets
1 tablet**
4-5 years
36-47 pounds (16-21.5 kg)
240 mg
3 tablets
1 ½ tablets**
6-8 years
48-59 pounds (21.5-27 kg)
320 mg
4 tablets
2 tablets
9-10 years
60-71 pounds (27-32.5 kg)
400 mg
5 tablets
2 ½ tablets
11 years
72-95 pounds (32.5-43 kg)
480 mg
6 tablets
3 tablets
≥12 years
96+ pounds (43.5+ kg)
640 mg
n/a
4 tablets
Age
Weight
Total Dose You Need to Give Your Child
If using infant drops (80 mg/0.8ml), you will need to give your child…
If using liquid (160 mg/5ml), you will need to give your child…
0-3 months
6-11 pounds (2.7-5 kg)
40 mg
0.4 ml**
n/a
4-11 months
12-17 pounds (5-8 kg)
80 mg
0.8 ml**
½ teaspoon
(2.5 ml)**
12-23 months
18-23 pounds (8-11 kg)
120 mg
1.2 ml**
¾ teaspoon
(3.75 ml)**
2-3 years
24-35 pounds (11-16 kg)
160 mg
1.6 ml
1 teaspoon (5 ml)
4-5 years
36-47 pounds (16-21.5 kg)
240 mg
n/a
1 ½ teaspoons
(7.5 ml)
6-8 years
48-59 pounds (21.5-27 kg)
320 mg
n/a
2 teaspoons (10 ml)
9-10 years
60-71 pounds (27-32.5 kg)
400 mg
n/a
2 ½ teaspoons
(12.5 ml)
11 years
72-95 pounds (32.5-43 kg)
480 mg
n/a
3 teaspoons (15 ml)

How Should I Store This Medication?

Store the medication at room temperature (68°F-77°F [20°C-25°C]) in a place that is free from moisture and light. Make sure that the medication is locked up and not accessible to any children.

When Should I Call A Doctor?

Call the doctor if your child has:
  • Signs of a more serious allergic reaction:
    • Wheezing
    • Chest tightness
    • Fever
    • Itching
    • Bad cough
    • Blue skin color
    • Convulsions
    • Swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • New or worsening stomach pain
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Jaundice , a condition marked by yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • Rash
Also, call the doctor if your child feels worse or the condition does not improve.
If you think your child may have overdosed , go to the emergency room or call your local poison control center right away.
 

RESOURCES

American Pharmacists Association Foundation
http://www.aphafoundation.org

United States Food and Drug Administration
http://www.fda.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Pharmacists Association
http://www.pharmacists.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

 

References


Acetaminophen. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us . Updated June 24, 2013. Accessed September 27, 2013.


Acetaminophen poisoning. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us . Updated February 21, 2013. Accessed September 27, 2013.


Acetaminophen oral solution. DailyMed website. Available at: http://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/lookup.cfm?setid=2b8a640c-6859-42b3-a5dc-7a7d2a12816c . Updated May 2013. Accessed September 27, 2013.


Children’s dosage guide. Tylenol website. Available at: http://www.tylenol.com/children/subchild . Accessed September 27, 2013.

 

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