Munson Health
 
Pertussis

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by Alan R

(Whooping Cough )

 

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your chances of getting pertussis include:
  • Not being immunized
  • Living in the same house or working in close contact with someone infected with pertussis
 

Prevention

Vaccine

The best way to prevent pertussis is immunization. All children (with few exceptions) should receive the DTaP vaccine series. This protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. Another vaccine called Tdap is routinely given to children aged 11-12 after they have completed the DTaP series of shots. There are also catch-up schedules for children and adults who have not been fully vaccinated.
Pregnant women should have a dose of Tdap during every pregnancy to protect newborns from pertussis.

Preventive Antibiotics

People in close contact with someone infected with pertussis may be advised to take preventive antibiotics, even if they've been vaccinated. This is especially important in households with members at high risk for severe disease, such as children under one year of age or people with weak immune systems.
 

RESOURCES

American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.healthychildren.org

Center for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

Public Health Agency of Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca

 

References


Immunization schedules. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html. Updated January 29, 2013. Accessed June 5, 2013.


Pertussis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated February 25, 2013. Accessed June 5, 2013.


Pertussis. PEMSoft at EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Accessed June 5, 2013.


Pertussis (whooping cough). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis. Updated May 7, 2013. Accessed June 5, 2013.


Tdap vaccine. What you need to know Centers for Disease control and Prevention Website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/tdap.pdf. Accessed June 5, 2013.

 

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