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Soft Tissue Sarcoma

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by Badash M

(Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Angiosarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Desmoid Sarcoma; Fibrosarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma; Liposarcoma; Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Lymphoma (lymphosarcoma); Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Synovial Sarcoma)

 

Treatment

After a sarcoma is found, staging tests are performed to find out if the cancer has spread and, if so, to what extent. Treatment depends on the stage of the cancer as well as the type.
Treatments may include:

Surgery

Surgery requires removal of the cancerous tumor and nearby tissue, and possibly nearby lymph nodes.

Radiation Therapy (or Radiotherapy)

Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) is the use of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. When a sarcoma is aggressive, the surgeon will remove as much of it as possible. Adding radiation will significantly reduce the chances of the cancer coming back. Radiation may be:
  • External radiation therapy—radiation directed at the tumor from a source outside the body
  • Internal radiation therapy—radioactive materials placed into the body near the cancer cells

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy may be given in many forms, including: pill, injection, or by catheter. The drugs enter the bloodstream and travel through the body killing mostly cancer cells, but also some healthy cells. Chemotherapy is generally reserved for only certain types of sarcomas, such as where chemotherapy is a standard offer and contributes significantly to cure or when the treatment is designed to slow the pace of the disease but is not considered a cure.
Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy may be given in many forms, including: pill, injection, or by catheter. The drugs enter the bloodstream and travel through the body killing mostly cancer cells, but also some healthy cells. Chemotherapy is generally reserved for only certain types of sarcomas, such as where chemotherapy is a standard offer and contributes significantly to cure or when the treatment is designed to slow the pace of the disease but is not considered a cure.
 

RESOURCES

American Cancer Society
http://www.cancer.org

National Cancer Institute
http://www.cancer.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Cancer Society
http://www.cancer.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-gc.ca

 

References


Soft tissue sarcoma. American Cancer Society website. Available at: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/sarcoma-adultsofttissuecancer/detailedguide/sarcoma-adult-soft-tissue-cancer-soft-tissue-sarcoma. Updated January 17, 2013. Accessed June 24, 2013.


Soft tissue sarcoma. National Cancer Institute website. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/soft-tissue-sarcoma. Accessed June 24, 2013.

 

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