Munson Health
 
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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by Alan R

(Lupus; SLE; Lupus, Systemic)

 

Treatment

SLE is not curable, but it can be managed with medications and lifestyle changes. You may also need treatment for issues caused by SLE.
Talk with your doctor about the best treatment plan for you. Treatment options depend on your symptoms.

Medication

There are many different kinds of medications that are used to treat SLE. Examples include:
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • Antimalarial drugs
  • Corticosteroids
  • Drugs to suppress the immune system
  • B-cell therapy
Your doctor may recommend that you take a combination of medications.

Preventing Flare-ups

Some lifestyle changes can help you prevent flare-ups of SLE. Work with your doctor to create a plan for your symptoms. Some steps may include:
  • Learn the signs of a flare-up and contact your doctor as soon as possible
  • Get immediate treatment for any cuts or infections
  • Manage symptoms for other chronic conditions caused by SLE
  • Avoid sun exposure
  • If you smoke, learn how to quit
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Limit emotional stress
  • Get enough rest
  • Exercise regularly, with your doctor's permission

Chronic Care

Chronic conditions liks SLE are best managed with strong communication between you and your health team. Make sure to go to all appointments as recommended. Let your doctor know about any changes in your health or care program.
Depression in people with chronic health conditions like SLE is common, emotional support is important. Surround yourself with supportive family and friends. If you are still having problems, consider counseling or joining a support group.
 

RESOURCES

Lupus Foundation of America, Inc.
http://www.lupus.org

Lupus Research Institute
http://www.lupusresearchinstitute.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Lupus Canada
http://www.lupuscanada.org

Lupus Foundation of Ontario
http://lupusfoundationofontario.com/

 

References


Handout on health: Systemic lupus erythematosus. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health%5FInfo/Lupus/default.asp . Updated August 2011. Accessed August 1, 2013.


Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php . Updated June 13, 2013. Accessed August 1, 2013.


Understanding lupus. Lupus Foundation of America website. Available at: http://www.lupus.org/webmodules/webarticlesnet/templates/new%5Flearnunderstanding.aspx?articleid=2231&zoneid=523 . Accessed August 1, 2013.


12/4/2009 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php : Hartkamp A, Geenen R, Godaert GL, Bijl M, Bijlsma JW, Derksen RH. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone on fatigue and well-being in women with quiescent systemic lupus erythematosus. A randomized controlled trial. Ann Rheum Dis . 2010;69(6):1144-1147.


5/6/2011 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php : Smyth A, Oliveira GH, Lahr BD, Bailey KR, Norby SM, Garovic VD. A systematic review and meta-analysis of pregnancy outcomes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol . 2010;5(11):2060-2068.


11/25/2013 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance. http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Ludvigsson JF, Rubio-Tapia A, et al. Increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in 29,000 patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease. J Rheumatol. 2012 Oct;39(10):1964-1970.

 

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