Munson Health
 
Medications for Osteoarthritis

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by Carson-DeWitt R
 
The information provided here is meant to give you a general idea about each of the medications listed below. Only the most general side effects are included, so ask your doctor if you need to take any special precautions. Use each of these medications as recommended by your doctor, or according to the instructions provided. If you have further questions about usage or side effects, contact your doctor.
There are a variety of medications available to treat the pain and inflammation of osteoarthritis. You may have to try different medications before you find the one that works best for you, with the least number of side effects.

Prescription Medications

  • Naproxen (Naprosyn, Anaprox, Aleve)
  • Ketoprofen (Nexcede)
  • Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin)
  • Indomethacin (Indocin)
  • Sulindac (Clinoril)
  • Meclofenamate (Meclomen)
  • Ketorolac (Toradol)
  • Piroxicam (Feldene)
  • Diclofenac (Voltaren, Solaraze )
  • Celecoxib (Celebrex)
  • Meloxicam (Mobic)
  • Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco)
  • Oxycodone (Percocet, OxyContin)
  • Morphine (MS-Contin)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Fentanyl (Duragesic)
  • Methadone
  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta)

Prescription Medications

 

References


John M Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science. Managing osteoarthritis pain with medicines: a review of the research for adults. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website. Available at: http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/index.cfm/search-for-guides-reviews-and-reports/?pageaction=displayproduct&productID=950&ECem=120215. Published February 15, 2012. Accessed July 23, 2013.


Osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation website. Available at: http://www.arthritis.org/conditions-treatments/disease-center/osteoarthritis. Accessed July 23, 2013.


Osteoarthritis. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health%5FInfo/Osteoarthritis/default.asp. Updated July 2010. Accessed July 23, 2013.


Sinusas, K. Osteoarthritis: Diagnosis and treatment. Am Fam Physician. 2012;85(1):49-56.


White WB. Cardiovascular risk, hypertension, and NSAIDs. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2007;9(1):36-43.


Wong M, Chowienczyk P, et al.Cardiovascular issues of COX-2 inhibitors and NSAIDs. Aust Fam Physician. 2005;34(11):945-948


3/17/2007 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Yelland MJ, Nickles CJ, et al. Celecoxib compared with sustained-release paracetamol for osteoarthritis: a series of n-of-1 trials. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2007;46:135-140. Epub 2006 Jun.


2/7/2008 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Underwood M, Ashby D, et al. Advice to use topical or oral ibuprofen for chronic knee pain in older people: randomised controlled trial and patient preference study. BMJ. 2008;336:138-142. Epub 2007 Dec 4.


10/26/2010 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Massey T, Derry S, et al. Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(6):CD007402.


11/15/2010 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: US Food and Drug Administration. FDA clears Cymbalta to treat chronic musculoskeletal pain. US Food and Drug Administration website. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm232708.htm. Published November 4, 2010. Accessed November 12, 2010.


2/17/2012 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Analgesics for osteoarthritis: an update of the 2006 comparative effectiveness review. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website. Available at: http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ehc/products/180/795/Analgesics-Update%5FCER-38%5F20111007.pdf. Published October 2011. Accessed July 23, 2013.

 

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