Munson Health
 
Shoulder Tendinopathy

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by Wood D

(Shoulder Tendonitis; Shoulder Tendinosis; Bicipital Tendinopathy; Bicipital Tendonitis; Bicipital Tendinosis; Supraspinatus Tendinopathy; Supraspinatus Tendonitis; Supraspinatus Tendinosis; Pitcher's Shoulder; Swimmer's Shoulder; Tennis Shoulder)

 

Treatment

Tendinopathy and the associated pain may take months to resolve. It can be frustrating but it is important to follow through with recommended treatment. Treatments include:

Rest, Ice, Heat

Avoid activities that cause shoulder pain.
Use ice or an ice pak to help control pain and swelling, It may help during the first 24-48 hours after injury or after exercise. Protect your skin by placing a towel between the ice and your skin
After a few days, heat may help decrease stiffness. Check with a doctor or therapist before using heat the first time. Protect your skin by placing a towel between the heat source and your skin.

Medication

The doctor may recommend medication to help reduce swelling and pain. Medication options include:
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to manage pain (eg, aspirin or ibuprofen )
  • Topical pain medicines (eg, cream, patches) that are applied to the skin
  • Steroid injection into the bursa overlying the rotator cuff to decrease inflammation
Persistent or severe pain may need further treatment. Your doctor may inject a steroid into the area. It can temporarily relieve pain. However, frequent injections can damage the tendon.

Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation will help you regain strength and range of motion in your shoulder. It will also help you prevent future injuries. Rehabilitation may include:
  • Physical therapy to strengthen muscles that control the shoulder
  • Exercises to maintain normal range of motion
  • Exercises for specific muscles that are used in sports or job activities
  • Gradual return to sports and work
  • Learning how to modify activities to prevent re-injury

Surgery

Severe injuries may require surgery to repair the tendon. The type of surgery will depend on the specific injuries.
 

RESOURCES

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
http://www.aaos.org/

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
http://www.aossm.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Orthopaedic Association
http://www.coa-aco.org/

Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation
http://www.canorth.org/

 

References


Bicpes tendinopathy. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us . Updated September 6, 2012. Accessed December 28, 2012.


Bursitis and tendonitis. National Institue of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health%5FInfo/Bursitis/default.asp . Accessed December 28, 2012.


Shoulder tendonitis. Cleveland Clinic website. Available at: http://my.clevelandclinic.org/disorders/Tendonitis/hic%5FShoulder%5FTendonitis.aspx . Accessed December 28, 2012.


Rotator Cuff Tendonitis. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons website. Available at: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00032 . Accessed December 28, 2012.


10/26/2010 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance : Massey T, Derry S, Moore R, McQuay H. Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(6):CD007402.

 

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