Munson Health
 
Jackson-Pratt Drain

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by Smith N

(JP Drain)

 

What to Expect

Prior to Procedure

Leading up to the procedure:

Anesthesia

General anesthesia will be used. It will block any pain and keep you asleep through the surgery.

Description of the Procedure

Once you are under anesthesia, your doctor will make an incision in your skin. The end of the drain tubing will be placed into the area where fluid has collected. The other end of the tubing will be connected to the squeeze bulb outside of your body. The doctor will remove the stopper from the bulb, squeeze it to create suction inside the drain system, and replace the stopper. This suction will pull the unwanted fluid out of your body. The doctor will then close the skin over the drain.
If you are having surgery, this JP drain will be inserted at the end of the operation.

Immediately After Procedure

If you are staying in the hospital, the nurses will care for and empty your drain.

How Long Will It Take?

15-20 minutes to place the JP drain

How Much Will It Hurt?

You may have mild to moderate pain where the JP drain is placed. Your doctor will recommend or prescribe medication to help with the pain.

Average Hospital Stay

This procedure is done in a hospital setting. The length of stay depends on the type of surgery you are having. You may be able to go home the same day if the surgery is minor.

Post-procedure Care

When you return home, do the following to help ensure a smooth recovery:
  • Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions .
  • Learn how to empty and care for the drain at home.
  • Ask your doctor if you can walk around with the JP drain.
  • Avoid bumping the drain.
  • Sleep on the side opposite of the drain. This will help you to avoid blocking the tubing or pulling it out of the suction bulb.
  • Ask your doctor about when it is safe to shower, bathe, or soak in water.
  • Ask your doctor what problems to watch for and when you should return for a follow-up appointment.
Removal of a drain depends on how fast you heal from the surgery or injury. Your doctor may remove the drain when there is less than 1-2 tablespoons (15-30 milliliters) of fluid per day being drained. If you have more than one drain, they may not be removed at the same time.
 

RESOURCES

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/index.htm

National Library of Medicine
http://www.nlm.nih.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/index%5Fe.html

Healthy U
http://www.healthyalberta.com

 

References


Care of the JP drain. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center website. Available at: http://patienteducation.upmc.com/Pdf/JPDrain.pdf. Accessed March 6, 2008.


Caring for your Jackson Pratt drainage system. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center website. Available at: http://www.mskcc.org/patient%5Feducation/shared/graphics/patienteducation/Patient%5FEducation%5FPublications/Self-Care/CaringForYourJacksonPrattDrainageSystem.pdf. Updated 2004. Accessed September 9, 2009.


Hughes S, Ozgur B, et al. Prolonged Jackson-Pratt drainage in the management of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Surg Neurol. 2006;65:410-414.

 

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