Munson Health
 
Anomalous Left Coronary Artery -- Child

Back to Document

by Neff DM

(ALCA—Child)

 

Diagnosis

The doctor will ask about your child’s symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Tests may include:
  • Echocardiogram —an imaging test that uses sound waves to look at the size, shape, and motion of the heart
  • Chest x-ray —an imaging test that uses low amounts of radiation to create an image of the chest
  • Electrocardiogram —a test that measures the electrical activity of the heart
  • MRI scan —a test that uses magnetic waves to make pictures of structures inside the chest
  • CT scan —a type of x-ray that uses a computer to make pictures of structures inside the chest
  • Cardiac catheterization —a test that uses a catheter (tube) and x-ray machine to assess the heart and its blood supply
 

RESOURCES

American Family Physician
http://www.aafp.org/

American Heart Association
http://www.americanheart.org/

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Cardiovascular Society
http://www.ccs.ca/

Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
http://ww2.heartandstroke.ca/splash/

 

References


Cove Point Foundation. Anomalous left coronary artery. Cove Point Foundation, Johns Hopkins University website. Available at: http://www.pted.org/?id=anomalouscoronary1 . Accessed July 12, 2010.


Mayo Clinic. Atrioventricular canal defect. Mayo Clinic website. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/atrioventricular-canal-defect/DS00745/DSECTION=risk-factors . Accessed July 7, 2010.


University of Michigan, CS Mott Children’s Hospital. Congenital heart defects: anomalous left coronary artery. University of Michigan, CS Mott Children’s Hospital website. Available at: http://www.med.umich.edu/mott/chc/patient%5Fcon%5Falca.html . Updated January 2010. Accessed July 12, 2010.

 

Revision Information