Munson Health
 
Diphtheria

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by Martin JJ
 

Prevention

The vaccine for diphtheria is safe and is effective at preventing the disease. All children with few exceptions should receive the DTaP vaccine series. This protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. A single dose of Tdap vaccine is recommended for children aged 11 years or older, even if they did not receive the DTaP. A booster should be administered every 10 years after, or after exposure to tetanus if necessary.
If you or your child has not been fully vaccinated, talk to their doctor. There are catch-up schedules available.
 

RESOURCES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
http://www.niaid.nih.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

HealthLinkBC
http://www.healthlinkbc.ca

Caring for Kids
The Canadian Paediatric Society
http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca

 

References


Diphtheria. Updated June 9, 2010. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Accessed June 19, 2014.


Diphtheria. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Presentable Diseases. Centers for Disease Control website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/dip.html. Updated May 7, 2012. Accessed June 19, 2014.


Immunization schedules for persons aged 0-18 years—United States, 2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/child-adolescent.html. Updated May 14, 2014. Accessed June 19, 2014.


Td (tetanus, diphtheria) VIS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/td.html. Updated February 4, 2014. Accessed June 19, 2014.


Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/tdap.html. Updated June 18, 2013. Accessed June 19, 2014.

 

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