Munson Health
 
Exploratory Laparotomy

Back to Document

by Polsdorfer R

(Abdominal Exploration; Laparotomy, Exploratory)

 

Reasons for Procedure

This procedure is done to evaluate problems in the abdomen.
Problems that may need to be examined with an exploratory laparotomy include:
The procedure may also be done to stage cancer or to biopsy the area.
 

What to Expect

Prior to Procedure

Leading up to your procedure:

Anesthesia

You may be given:
  • General anesthesia , which is most common—blocks pain and keeps you asleep through the surgery; given through an IV in your hand or arm
  • Spinal anesthesia , which is used in very ill patients—the area from the chest down to the legs is numbed

Description of the Procedure

A long incision will be made in the skin on your abdomen. The organs will be examined for disease. The doctor may take a biopsy . If the problem is something that can be repaired or removed, it will be done at this time. The opening will be closed using staples or stitches.

How Long Will It Take?

About 1-4 hours

How Much Will It Hurt?

Anesthesia will prevent pain during surgery. Pain and discomfort after the procedure can be managed with medications.

Average Hospital Stay

You will be in the hospital several days. If you have problems, you may need to stay longer.

Post-procedure Care

At the Hospital
  • You may need to wear special socks or boots to help prevent blood clots.
  • You may have a foley catheter for a short time to help you urinate.
  • You may use an incentive spirometer to help you breathe deeply.
Preventing Infection
During your stay, the hospital staff will take steps to reduce your chance of infection, such as:
  • Washing their hands
  • Wearing gloves or masks
  • Keeping your incisions covered
There are also steps you can take to reduce your chance of infection, such as:
  • Washing your hands often and reminding your healthcare providers to do the same
  • Reminding your healthcare providers to wear gloves or masks
  • Not allowing others to touch your incision
At Home
It may take several weeks for you to recover.
  • Follow your doctor's instructions .
  • The doctor will remove the sutures or staples in 7-10 days.
  • Take proper care of the incision site. This will help to prevent an infection.
  • Ask your doctor about when it is safe to shower, bathe, or soak in water.
  • During the first two weeks, rest and avoid lifting.
  • Slowly increase your activities. Begin with light chores, short walks, and some driving. Depending on your job, you may be able to return to work.
  • To promote healing, eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables .
  • Try to avoid constipation by:
 

Call Your Doctor

Call your doctor if any of these occur:
If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.
 

RESOURCES

American Cancer Society
http://www.cancer.org

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Digestive Health Foundation
http://www.cdhf.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

 

References


Laparotomy. Better Health Channel website. Available at: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Laparotomy. Updated July 2011. Accessed May 23, 2013.


Testing biopsy and cytology specimens for cancer. American Cancer Society website. Available at: http://www.cancer.org/treatment/understandingyourdiagnosis/examsandtestdescriptions/testingbiopsyandcytologyspecimensforcancer/index?sitearea=ped. Accessed May 23, 2013.

 

Revision Information