Munson Health
 
Uterine Rupture

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by Walsh B

(Spontaneous Uterine Rupture; Uterine Scar Disruption)

 

Prevention

If you have one or more risk factors for uterine rupture, develop a thorough birth and complication plan with your doctor.
In many cases, women who delivered a previous baby via cesarean section can attempt a vaginal delivery (VBAC). If you decide to deliver vaginally after a cesarean, your baby will need constant fetal monitoring . You should only deliver the baby in a facility where emergency surgery is available. Talk with your doctor about the best delivery plan for you.
 

RESOURCES

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
http://www.acog.org

American Pregnancy Association
http://www.americanpregnancy.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
http://www.sogc.org

Women's Health
http://www.womenshealthmatters.ca

 

References


Toppenberg K, Block W. Uterine rupture. Am Fam Physician . 2002;66(5):823-829.


Vaginal birth after previous cesarean delivery. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Practice Bulletin, No. 115 . August 2010. Reaffirmed 2013.


Trial of vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us . Updated April 22. 2013. Accessed June 5, 2013.


Kaczmarczyk M, Sparén P, et al. Risk factors for uterine rupture and neonatal consequences of uterine rupture: a population-based study of successive pregnancies in Sweden. BJOG. 2007;114(10):1208-1214.

 

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