Munson Health
 
Hordeolum

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by Borowski M

(Stye)

 

Treatment

Drainage

Drainage of the lesion is the first step in treating the hordeolum. If the hordeolum does not drain on its own, your doctor may assist drainage of the infection by lancing the hordeolum. The pus and contents of the swollen area can then be drained. It is important never to try to lance the hordeolum without the assistance of a doctor; permanent damage to the eye or eyelid can occur.

Antibiotics

In some cases, antibiotics are also given to ensure that the entire infection is eliminated. Antibiotics may be given in oral form, or as eye drops/eye ointment. In many cases, antibiotics alone are ineffective.
If you are diagnosed with a hordeolum, follow your doctor's instructions.
 

RESOURCES

The American Academy of Ophthalmology
http://www.aao.org

The American Optometric Association
http://www.aoa.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Association of Optometrists
http://www.opto.ca

Canadian Ophthalmological Society
http://www.eyesite.ca

 

References


Hordeolum. The Merck Manual website. Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/eye%5Fdisorders/eyelid%5Fand%5Flacrimal%5Fdisorders/chalazion%5Fand%5Fhordeolum%5Fstye.html. Accessed August 25, 2005.


Hordeolum (stye)/chalazion. John Hopkins website. Available at: http://prod.hopkins-abxguide.org/diagnosis/heent/hordeolum%5F%5Fstye%5F%5Fchalazion.html?contentInstanceId=255294. Accessed July 21, 2009.


Pasternak A, Irish B. Ophthalmologic infections in primary care. Clinics in Family Practice. 2004;6:19-633.


Skorin L. Hordeolum and chalazion treatment, the full gamut. Optometry Today website. Available at: http://www.optometry.co.uk/clinical/details?aid=247. Accessed August 25, 2005.

 

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