Munson Health
 
Toxic Shock Syndrome

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by Wood D

(TSS)

 

Risk Factors

Factors that increase your risk of TSS include:
 

Symptoms

A person with TSS often appears very ill. Symptoms usually come on suddenly. Fever, chills, and body aches may start up to four days before other symptoms develop such as:
Symptoms of severe TSS include:
  • Fainting, severe lightheadedness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Seizures
  • Fluid retention
The infection can lead to severe complications such as:
  • Kidney failure—little or no urine production
  • Gangrene
  • Pancreatitis
  • Heart problems
  • Liver failure
  • Low platelet count
 

RESOURCES

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
http://www.acog.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
http://www.sogc.org

Women's Health Matters
http://www.womenshealthmatters.ca

 

References


Imöhl M, van der Linden M, Reinert RR, Ritter K. Invasive group A streptococcal disease and association with varicella in Germany, 1996-2009. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2011 Jun;62(1):101-109.


Tampons and asbestos, dioxin and toxic shock syndrome. United States Food and Drug Administration website. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/AlertsandNotices/PatientAlerts/ucm070003.htm. Updated March 20, 2013. Accessed August 5, 2013.


Toxic shock syndrome. Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh website. Available at: http://www.chp.edu/CHP/P02550. Updated January 2011. Accessed August 5, 2013.


Toxic shock syndrome. Nemours Kids Health website. Available at: http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial%5Fviral/toxic%5Fshock.html. Updated January 2011. Accessed August 5, 2013.


Tyner HL, Schlievert PM, Baddour LM. Beta-hemolytic streptococcal erythroderma syndrome: a clinical and pathogenic analysis. Am J Med Sci. 2011 Aug 11.

 

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