Munson Health
 
Miscarriage

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by Wood D

(Spontaneous Abortion)

 

Causes

Miscarriages often occur for the following reasons:
In some cases, the cause of miscarriage is unknown.
 

Risk Factors

Miscarriages are more common in women 35 years and older. Other factors that may increase your chance of having a miscarriage include:
A miscarriage during your first pregnancy may place you at a higher risk for complications during your next pregnancy. These complications may include:
 

Diagnosis

You will be asked about your symptoms, the length of your pregnancy, and when you first noticed a change in your condition. The doctor will perform physical and pelvic exams.
Prior to miscarriage, tests may include:
  • Ultrasound—to assess the health of the fetus
  • Blood tests—to check the exact amount of the hormone (called human chorionic gonadotropin or hCG) important to sustain an early pregnancy
After miscarriage, tests may include:
  • Examination of the tissue that has passed through the vagina
  • Blood tests—to check for a chromosomal error in the man or the woman or to check hormone and antibody levels
  • Endometrial biopsy—to check the uterine lining to see if it can support a pregnancy
Imaging tests may be used to evaluate the uterus and surrounding structures. These may include:
 

RESOURCES

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
http://www.acog.org

March of Dimes
http://www.marchofdimes.com

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
http://www.sogc.org

Women's Health Matters
http://www.womenshealthmatters.ca

 

References


First trimester pregnancy loss. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated October 25, 2013. Accessed August 19, 2014.


Miscarriage. American Pregnancy Association website. Available at: http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancycomplications/miscarriage.html. Updated June 2014. Accessed August 19, 2014.


Miscarriage. March of Dimes website. Available at: http://www.marchofdimes.com/loss/miscarriage.aspx. Updated July 2012. Accessed August 19, 2014.


Second trimester pregnancy loss. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated February 28, 2014. Accessed August 19, 2014.


Recurrent pregnancy loss. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated August 11, 2014. Accessed August 19, 2014.


12/2/2008 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Winther JF, Boice JD Jr, Svendsen AL, Frederiksen K, Stovall M, Olsen JH. Spontaneous abortion in a Danish population-based cohort of childhood cancer survivors. J Clin Oncol. 2008;26:4340-4346.


4/16/2009 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Bhattacharya S, Townend J, Shetty A, Campbell D, Bhattacharya S. Does miscarriage in an initial pregnancy lead to adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes in the next continuing pregnancy? BJOG. 2008;115:1623-1629.


6/25/2010 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Nakhai-Pour HR, Broy P, Bérard A. Use of antidepressants during pregnancy and the risk of spontaneous abortion. CMAJ. 2010 May 31.

 

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