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Hemorrhoids

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by Scholten A

(Piles)

 

Risk Factors

Factors that increase your risk of getting hemorrhoids include:
 

Treatment

Nonsurgical Procedures

If these treatments do not provide relief, one of several nonsurgical procedures may be used to shrink or destroy the hemorrhoidal tissue. These procedures, which are generally performed in a doctor’s office, include:
  • Rubber band ligation —a rubber band is placed around the base of the hemorrhoid to cut off circulation and force the hemorrhoid to wither away within a few days
  • Sclerotherapy—a chemical solution is injected near the blood vessel to cause scarring and shrinkage of the hemorrhoid
  • Coagulation therapy—electricity, laser, or infrared light is used to shrink the hemorrhoidal tissue

Surgery

If nonsurgical procedures are not an option or fail to resolve the problem, surgery may be needed.
Hemorrhoidectomy is the permanent removal of hemorrhoids by cutting the hemorrhoidal tissue away. Some of the newest surgical treatments involve using stainless steel staples. While many surgeons favor these treatments, there is some evidence that techniques that are more traditional produce more consistent and long-lasting relief.
If you are diagnosed with hemorrhoids, follow your doctor's instructions .
If you are diagnosed with hemorrhoids, follow your doctor's instructions .
 

RESOURCES

American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons
http://www.fascrs.org

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
http://www.cag-acg.org

The College of Family Physicians of Canada
http://www.cfpc.ca

 

References


Alonso-Coello P, Guyatt G, Heels-Ansdell D, et al. Laxatives for the treatment of hemorrhoids. Cochrane Database Syst Rev . 2005;(4):CD004649.


Altomare DF, Rinaldi M, La Torre F, et al. Red hot chili pepper and hemorrhoids: the explosion of a myth: results of a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Dis Colon Rectum . 2006;49:1018-1023.


Hemorrhoids. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons website. Available at: http://www.fascrs.org/patients/conditions/hemorrhoids/ . Updated October 2012. Accessed May 30, 2013.


Hemorrhoids. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us . Updated March 21, 2013. Accessed May 30, 2013.


Hemorrhoids. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse website. Available at: http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/hemorrhoids/index.aspx . Updated April 30, 2012. Accessed May 30, 2013.


Jayaraman S, Colquhoun PH, Malthaner RA. Stapled versus conventional surgery for hemorrhoids. Cochrane Database Syst Rev . 2006;(4):CD005393.

 

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