Munson Health
 
Coccyx Fracture

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by Wood D

(Tailbone Fracture; Broken Tailbone)

 

Risk Factors

Coccyx fractures are more common in women. Other risk factors that may increase your chance of a coccyx fracture include:
  • Increased age
  • Osteoporosis
  • Certain diseases or conditions that result in bone or mineral loss, such as abnormal or absent menstrual cycles or menopause
  • Decreased muscle mass
  • Certain congenital bone conditions
  • Participating in certain activities, such as skating or contact sports that may lead to falls in a seated position
  • Violence
 

RESOURCES

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
http://www.orthoinfo.org

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
http://www.sportsmed.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Orthopaedic Association
http://www.coa-aco.org

Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation
http://www.canorth.org

 

References


Acute low back pain. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 8, 2014. Accessed September 12, 2014.


Coccydynia. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated June 28, 2010. Accessed September 12, 2014


Fractured coccyx. Cure Back Pain website. Available at: http://www.cure-back-pain.org/fractured-coccyx.html. Accessed September 12, 2014.


Low back pain. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons website. Available at: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00311. Updated December 2013. Accessed September 12, 2014.


Spinal cord injury—acute management. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated December 10, 2013. Accessed September 12, 2014.

 

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