Munson Health
 
Wolfberry

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Alternate Names/Related Terms:

  • Lycium Fruit, Lycium Fructus, Tibetan Goji Berry, Goji Juice, Gou Qi Zi
 

Uses

 

Principal Proposed Uses

  • none
 

Other Proposed Uses

Wolfberry, the berry of the Lycium chinensis plant, have a long history of use in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Chinese herbal medicine is part of an ancient and complex medical system that analyzes the effects of treatments in terms of their effects on the "energy" of various organs. Within this system, lycium berry has the following effects: nourishing liver and kidneys, moistening the lungs and supplementing the yin. (For more information on these pre-scientific medical concepts, see the full Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicine article.) Typical uses based on these actions include life extension and treatment of dry skin, dizziness, diminished sexual desire, low back pain and chronic dry cough.
The Tibetan Goji berry is closely related to Chinese lycium.
 

References

1
Ha KT, Yoon SJ, Choi DY et al. Protective effect of Lycium Chinese fruit on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity. J Ethnopharmacol. 2004;96:529-35.

2
Ram VJ. Herbal preparations as a source of hepatoprotective agents. Drug News Perspect. 2003;14:353-63.

3
Chin YW, Lim SW, Kim SH et al. Hepatoprotective pyrrole derivatives of Lycium Chinese fruits. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2002;13:79-81.

4
Yu MS, Leung SK, Lai SW et al. Neuroprotective effects of anti-aging oriental medicine Lycium barbarum against beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity. Exp Gerontol. 2005;40:716-27.

5
Zhang M, Chen H, Huang J et al. Effect of lycium barbarum polysaccharide on human hepatoma QGY7703 cells: inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Life Sci. 2005;76:2115-24.

6
Luo Q, Cai Y, Yan J et al. Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects and antioxidant activity of fruit extracts from Lycium barbarum. Life Sci. 2004;76:137-49.

 

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