Munson Health
 
Indigestion

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by Davies R

(Dyspepsia; Non-ulcer Dyspepsia; Non-ulcer Stomach Pain)

 

Treatment

Your doctor will suggest a plan based on the severity of your symptoms. Treatment options may include the following:

Dietary and Lifestyle Changes

Your doctor may advise you to:

Medications

Medications your doctor may recommend include:
  • Antacids—to help neutralize stomach acid
  • Acid suppression agents
  • Prokinetic agents—to help the stomach empty its contents more quickly
  • Antibiotics—to treat a bacterial infection if tests confirm that you have this infection
 

RESOURCES

The American College of Gastroenterology
http://www.acg.gi.org

American Gastroenterological Association
http://www.gastro.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
http://www.cag-acg.org

The College of Family Physicians of Canada
http://www.cfpc.ca

 

References


Dyspepsia: treatment. American Academy of Family Physicians' FamilyDoctor website. Available at: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/dyspepsia/treatment.html. Updated November 2010. Accessed December 16, 2013.


Karamanolis G, Caenepeel P, Arts J, Tack J. Association of the predominant symptom with clinical characteristics and pathophysiological mechanisms in functional dyspepsia. Gastroenterology. 2006; 130:296


Mertz H, Fullerton S, Naliboff B, Mayer EA. Symptoms and visceral perception in severe functional organic dyspepsia. Gut. 1998; 42:814.


Tack J, Talley NJ, Camilleri M, et al. Functional gastroduodenal disorders. Gastroenterology. 2006; 130:466


3/1/2010 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Maalox Total Relief and Maalox liquid products: medication use errors. US Food and Drug Administration website. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm200672.htm. Published February 17, 2010. Accessed December 16, 2013.

 

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