Munson Health
 
Medications to Treat Side Effects of Melanoma Treatment

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by Wood D
 
The information provided here is meant to give you a general idea about each of the medications listed below. Only the most general side effects are included, so ask your doctor if you need to take any special precautions. Use each of these medications as recommended by your doctor, or according to the instructions provided. If you have further questions about usage or side effects, contact your healthcare provider.
Medications may help to either prevent or reduce side effects of treatment or to manage certain side effects once they occur. You can develop side effects from the treatment and/or from the cancer itself. Tell your doctor when you notice a new symptom, and ask him or her if any of these medications are appropriate for you.

Prescription Medications

  • Prochlorperazine (Compazine)
  • Ondansetron (Zofran)
  • Granisetron (Granisol)
  • Metoclopramide (Reglan)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Hydrostat)
  • Morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, Avinza, Oramorph SR, Roxanol)
  • Fentanyl (Duragesic)
  • Methadone
  • Oxycodone (Oxecta, Oxycontin)
  • Oxymorphone (Opana)
  • Hydrocodone and acetaminophen (Vicodin)
  • Oxycodone and acetaminophen (Percocet)
  • Tapentadol (Nucynta)
  • Filgrastim (Neupogen)
  • Epoetin (Epogen, Procrit)

Over-the-Counter Medications

  • Ibuprofen
  • Naproxen

Prescription Medications

Special Considerations

Whenever you are taking a prescription medication, take the following precautions:
  • Take them as directed—not more, not less, not at a different time.
  • Do not stop taking them without consulting your doctor.
  • Do not share them with anyone else.
  • Know what effects and side effects to expect, and report them to your doctor.
  • If you are taking more than one drug, even if it is over-the-counter, be sure to check with a physician or pharmacist about drug interactions.
  • Plan ahead for refills so you don’t run out.
 

References


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FDA's MedWatch safety alerts: March 2009. US Food and Drug Administration website. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm142815.htm. Updated August 9, 2012. Accessed April 4, 2013.


Epoetin Alfa. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated January 18, 2013. Accessed April 8, 2013.


Filgrastim. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us . Updated January 18, 2013. Accessed April 8, 2013.


Granisetron. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php. Updated January 18, 2013. Accessed April 8, 2013.


Gourlay DL, Heit HA, et al. Universal precautions in pain medicine: a rational approach to the treatment of chronic pain. Pain Med. 2005;6(2):107.


Larson AM, Polson J, Fontana RJ, et al; Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure: results of a United States multicenter, prospective study. Hepatology. 2005;42(6):1364.


Metoclopramide. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated January 18, 2013. Accessed April 8, 2013.


Ondansetron. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated February 28, 2013. Accessed April 8, 2013.


Prochlorperazine. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated January 18, 2013. Accessed April 8, 2013.


White WB.Cardiovascular risk, hypertension, and NSAIDs. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2007 Apr;9(1):36-43.


Wong M, Chowienczyk P, et al.Cardiovascular issues of COX-2 inhibitors and NSAIDs. Aust Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;34(11):945-948.

 

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