Munson Health
 
Medications for Panic Disorder

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by Scholten A
 
This information is meant to give you a general idea about each of the medications listed below. Only the most general side effects are included. Ask your doctor if you need to take any safety measures. Use each of these medications as directed by your doctor or according to the instructions provided. If you have further questions about usage or side effects, contact your doctor.
Anxiolytics (anti-anxiety medicines) and antidepressants can help ease the symptoms of panic disorder. They are often used along with counseling. Depending on the person, medicine may be used for a short time or for a long period of time, medicine helps relieve symptoms. It should not take the place of counseling (psychotherapy). Psychotherapy can address the root of the problem.

Prescription Medicines

  • Citalopram
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Paroxetine
  • Fluoxetine
  • Sertraline
  • Escitalopram
  • Lorazepam
  • Prazepam
  • Flurazepam
  • Clonazepam
  • Triazolam
  • Chlordiazepoxide
  • Halazepam
  • Temazepam
  • Oxazepam
  • Clorazepate
  • Diazepam
  • Alprazolam
  • Doxepin
  • Clomipramine
  • Nortriptyline
  • Amitriptyline
  • Imipramine
  • Maprotiline
  • Desipramine
  • Trimipramine
  • Protriptyline
  • Trazodone
  • Venlafaxine
  • Nefazodone
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Phenelzine
  • Tranylcypromine

Prescription Medicines

  Benzodiazepines
Common names include:
  • Lorazepam
  • Prazepam
  • Flurazepam
  • Clonazepam
  • Triazolam
  • Chlordiazepoxide
  • Halazepam
  • Temazepam
  • Oxazepam
  • Clorazepate
  • Diazepam
  • Alprazolam
These drugs can be habit-forming when used long-term or in excess. This may cause withdrawal symptoms such as “rebound panic,” anxiety, irritability, and insomnia when stopped. If you have had a problem with substance abuse (alcoholism, drug addiction), talk to your doctor about whether or not you should use benzodiazepines.
Do not take benzodiazepines with alcohol or other drugs that cause drowsiness. Do not take if you must drive a vehicle or operate equipment. These drugs should not be taken with certain oral antifungal medicines or by people with certain types of glaucoma.
Possible side effects include:
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness, particularly in elderly persons
  • Confusion
  • Reduced coordination
  • Slow reaction time
 

References


Antidepressant use in children, adolescents, and adults. US Food and Drug Administration website. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/InformationbyDrugClass/UCM096273. Published May 22, 2009. Accessed November 21, 2012.


Panic disorder. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated April 23, 2012. Accessed November 21, 2012.


Panic disorder. National Institute of Mental Health website. Available at: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/panic-disorder/index.shtml. Updated November 19, 2012. Accessed November 21, 2012.


Ravindran LN, Stein MB. The pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders: a review of progress. J Clin Psychiatry. 2010;71(7):839-854.


USP DI. 21st ed. Micromedex; 2001.


2/18/2011 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Serretti A, Mandelli L. Antidepressants and body weight: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis. J Clin Psychiatry. 2010;71(10):1259-1272.

 

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