Munson Health
 
Anemia

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by McCoy K
 

Definition

Anemia is a low level of healthy red blood cells (RBC). RBCs carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. When red blood cells are low, the body does not get enough oxygen.
There are several specific types of anemia, including:
Red Blood Cells
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Causes

The main causes of anemia are:
 

Treatment

Talk with your doctor about the best plan for you. Options include:

Nutrition

Your doctor may suggest changes to your diet. The diet may include foods rich in iron, vitamin C, vitamin B12, and folate. Vitamins or iron supplements may be added.

Blood Transfusions

A blood transfusion delivers blood cells from healthy donor blood.

Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplant

This procedure places healthy bone marrow or stem cells in the body. The goal is for the new tissue to produce healthy blood cells. This procedure carries risk. It is only done in severe cases of anemia.

Surgery

Critical bleeding may be treated with surgery. In cases of very high RBC destruction, your spleen may need to be surgically removed.
 

RESOURCES

Iron Disorders Institute
http://www.irondisorders.org

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Blood Services
http://www.blood.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

 

References


Anemia—differential diagnosis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated September 8, 2011. Accessed August 19, 2014.


Guralnik JM, Eisenstaedt RS, Ferrucci L, Klein HG, Woodman RC. Prevalence of anemia in persons 65 years and older in the United States: evidence for a high rate of unexplained anemia. Blood. 2004;104:2263-2268.


Nissenson AR, Goodnough LT, Dubois RW. Anemia: not just an innocent bystander? Arch Intern Med. 2003;163:1400-1404.


What is anemia? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/anemia/anemia%5Fwhatis.html. Updated May 18, 2012. Accessed November 1, 2012.

 

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