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Achalasia

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by Alan R

(Esophageal Achalasia)

 

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to make it easier for the LES to open. Treatment may include:

Pneumatic Dilation

This treatment stretches the LES muscle. A thin tube is inserted into the throat. At the end of this tube is an uninflated balloon. When the tube reaches the LES muscle, the balloon is inflated. Pneumatic dilation has a high success rate. It is the primary treatment in most patients, although the procedure may need to be repeated.

Botulinum Toxin

Tiny amounts of botulinum toxin, type A, are injected into the LES. Botulinum causes the LES to relax, which makes it easier to open. Since the effect is temporary, repeat injections are almost always needed. The response decreases with successive injections.

Medication

Certain medications may help those that can not tolerate surgery and do not have success with botulinum therapy. The symptom relief is temporary.
Certain medications may help those that can not tolerate surgery and do not have success with botulinum therapy. The symptom relief is temporary.
 

RESOURCES

American Academy of Family Physicians
http://www.familydoctor.org

American College of Gastroenterology
http://www.acg.gi.org/

American Gastroenterological Association
http://www.gastro.org/

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
http://www.cag-acg.org/

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/index-eng.php/

 

References


Achalasia. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php . Updated August 7, 2012. Accessed October 26, 2012.


Achalasia and esophageal motility disorders. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons website. Available at: http://www.sts.org/patient-information/esophageal-surgery/achalasia-and-esophageal-motility-disorders . Accessed October 26, 2012.


Vaezi MF, Pandolfino JE, Vela MF. Diagnosis and management of achalasia. Am J Gastro. 2013;108:1238-1249.


2/13/2014 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Vaezi M, Pandolfino J, et al. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Achalasia. Am J Gastroenterol. online publication, 23 July 2013.

 

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