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Gastric Ulcer

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by McCoy K

(Stomach Ulcer; Ulcer, Gastric; Ulcer, Stomach)

 

Treatment

Talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan for you. Treatment options may include one or more of the following:

Medication

Your doctor may recommend:
  • Antibiotics if an infection is present or possible
  • Over-the-counter antacids
  • Proton pump inhibitors
  • H-2 blockers
  • Medications to coat ulcer
  • Medications to protect stomach against NSAID damage

Lifestyle Changes

You and your doctor will discuss lifestyle changes. These may include:
  • Quit smoking . Smoking worsens symptoms and slows healing.
  • Limit alcohol intake.
  • Avoid NSAIDs. This includes over-the-counter drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen .

Surgery and Endoscopy

Surgery and/or endoscopy may be recommended for:
  • An ulcer that won't heal
  • Recurring ulcers
  • A bleeding ulcer
  • A perforated ulcer
  • Problems with food passing out of stomach
Endoscopy
This may be done to stop bleeding. A thin, lighted tube is inserted down the throat into the stomach or intestine. Heat, electricity, epinephrine, or a substance called fibrin glue can then be applied to the area. This should stop the blood flow.
Surgery
Surgery for gastric ulcers is rare, but it can greatly reduce acid production. Common procedures include:
  • Removal of the ulcer
  • Removal of part of the stomach or small intestine, and creating a new connection between the them
  • Tying off the bleeding blood vessel
  • Taking tissue from another part of the intestine and oversewing the ulcer
  • Cutting part of the nerve to reduce acid production
 

Prevention

To reduce your chance of getting H. pylori infection:
To reduce your chance of getting a gastric ulcer from NSAIDs:
  • Use other drugs when possible for managing pain.
  • Take the lowest possible dose.
  • Don't take drugs longer than needed.
  • Don't drink alcohol while taking the drugs.
  • Ask your doctor about switching to medicines less likely to cause ulcers. Talk to your doctor about taking other drugs to protect your stomach and intestine lining.
  • Don't smoke. Cigarette smoking increases the chances of getting an ulcer.
 

RESOURCES

The American College of Gastroenterology
http://gi.org

American Gastroenterological Association
http://www.gastro.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
http://cag-acg.org

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

 

References


H. pylori and peptic ulcers. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse website. Available at: http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/hpylori/index.aspx. Updated April 30, 2012. Accessed April 29, 2013.


Meurer LN, Bower DJ. Management of helicobacter pylori infection. Am Fam Physician. 2002;65(7):1327-1336.


Peptic ulcer disease. American College of Gastroenterology website. Available at: http://patients.gi.org/topics/peptic-ulcer-disease. Accessed April 29, 2013.


Peptic ulcer disease. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated April 22, 2013. Accessed April 29, 2013.


Understanding peptic ulcer disease. American Gastroenterological Association website. Available at: http://www.gastro.org/patient-center/digestive-conditions/peptic-ulcer-disease. Published April 23, 2010. Accessed April 29, 2013.

 

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