Munson Health
 
Ventricular Tachycardia

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by Vann M
 

Risk Factors

The following factors may increase your chance of ventricular tachycardia:
  • Coronary artery disease
  • History of heart attacks
  • Heart abnormalities (eg, cardiomyopathy, mitral valve prolapse , valvular heart disease, ion channel disorders)
  • Diagnosis of electrical instability
  • Sarcoidosis
  • Beginning treatment for hypothyroidism
  • Use of certain medicines (eg, digitalis, antipsychotics, anti-arrhythmic drugs)
  • Extreme physical or emotional overstimulation
  • Low oxygen levels in the blood
  • Very high levels of acid in bodily fluids (eg, due to kidney disease or diabetes)
  • Stimulants (eg, caffeine, cocaine , alcohol )
Coronary Artery Disease
Coronary Artery plaque
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.
 

Treatment

In an emergency situation, CPR or a defibrillator may be required.
Other treatment options may include:
If other approaches fail, an automatic defibrillator will be inserted into the heart to deliver shocks as needed to keep the heart rate steady.
 

RESOURCES

American Heart Association
http://www.heart.org

Heart Rhythm Society
http://www.hrsonline.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canadian Cardiovascular Society
http://www.ccs.ca

Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
http://www.heartandstroke.com

 

References


Ventricular tachycardia. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/. Updated March 29, 2012. Accessed September 5, 2012.


Ventricular tachycardia. The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook website. Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/heart%5Fand%5Fblood%5Fvessel%5Fdisorders/abnormal%5Fheart%5Frhythms/ventricular%5Ftachycardia.html. Updated January 2008. Accessed September 5, 2012.


Ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. New York-Presbyterian Hospital website. Available at: http://nyp.org/health/ventricular-tachycardia-fibrillation.html. Accessed September 5, 2012.

 

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