Munson Health
 
Panhypopituitarism

Back to Document

by Kohnle D

(PHP; Underactive Pituitary Gland)

 

Symptoms

Compression of the Tumor

Compression of the tumor on local structures, especially the nerves of the eyes, can cause:
  • Blurred vision
  • Loss of visual field
  • Poor temperature control

Insufficient Hormones

  • Insufficient levels of gonadotropins can cause:
  • Insufficient levels of growth hormone can cause:
    • In children: stunted growth or dwarfism
    • In adults: weakness, obesity , reduced cardiac output, low blood sugar levels, and reduced exercise tolerance
  • Insufficient levels of thyroid-stimulating hormones can lead to:
    • Underactive thyroid , which causes confusion, hair loss, weakness, slow heart rate, muscle stiffness, intolerance to cold, constipation , weight gain, and dry skin
  • Insufficient corticotrophic levels can lead to:
    • Underactive adrenal gland, which causes low blood pressure, low blood sugar , fatigue, weight loss, vomiting, and low stress tolerance—This can be life-threatening.
  • Excessive prolactin levels can cause:
    • In women: missed periods, infertility, and milk secretion
    • In men: reduced facial and body hair, small testes
  • Insufficient antidiuretic hormone (rare) can cause:
    • Excessive thirst and frequent urination
    • Night-time urination
 

Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done.
Tests may include the following:
  • MRI scan —a test that uses magnetic waves to make pictures of structures inside the body
  • Blood tests—Blood tests—to measure pituitary, as well as target gland hormone levels
  • Stimulation tests—to test the maximum capacity of the endocrine glands, usually of the pituitary gland
  • Semen analysis—in males suspected of infertility
 

RESOURCES

The Hormone Foundation
http://www.hormone.org/

The Pituitary Network
http://www.pituitary.org/

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

About Kids Health
http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/

 

References


Bhasin S, Cunningham GR, Hayes FJ, et al. Testosterone therapy in adult men with androgen deficiency syndromes: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006;91:1995-2010.


Diabetes & other endocrine and metabolic disorders: hypopituitarism. Lucile Packard Children's Hospital website. Available at: http://www.lpch.org/DiseaseHealthInfo/HealthLibrary/diabetes/hypop.html . Accessed May 30, 2007.


Geffner M. Panhypopituitarism. The Magic Foundation website. Available at: http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:MHUYAhcYci8J:https://www.magicfoundation.org/downloads/PanPitpdf669.pdf+Panhypopituitarism&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=8&gl=us . Accessed May 30, 2007.


Randeva HS, Schoebel J, Byrne J, et al. Classical pituitary apoplexy: clinical features, management and outcome. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) . 1999;51:181-188.


Schneider HJ, Aimaretti G, Kreitschmann-Andermahr I, et al. Hypopituitarism. Lancet. 2007;269:1461-1470.


Toogood AA, Stewart PM. Hypopituitarism: clinical features, diagnosis, and management. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 1998;37:235-261


What is a growth disorder? Nemours Foundation website. Available at: http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/endocrine/growth%5Fdisorder.html . Accessed May 30, 2007.

 

Revision Information