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Mild Cognitive Impairment

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by Rosenblum LB
 

Definition

People with MCI-AT who are over age 65 have a higher chance of developing dementia and Alzheimer's. However, many people with MCI-AT never develop these disorders. Some even return to normal.
Areas of the Brain
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Medications

Researchers are currently studying the effects that several medications may have on slowing cognitive decline. These include:
 

Risk Factors

MCI-AT is more common in people who 65 years and older. Other factors that may increase your chance of developing MCI-AT include:
Research also suggests that these may be risk factors for MCI-AT:
  • Smoking
  • Lack of social contact
  • Low educational level
  • Excessive response to stress
  • Poor nutrition and lack of vitamins
  • Exposure to toxins

Medications

Researchers are currently studying the effects that several medications may have on slowing cognitive decline. These include:

Medications

Researchers are currently studying the effects that several medications may have on slowing cognitive decline. These include:
 

RESOURCES

National Institute on Aging
http://www.nia.nih.gov

Psych—American Psychiatric Association
http://www.psych.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

The Alzheimer Society of Canada
http://www.alzheimer.ca

Seniors Canada
http://www.seniors.gc.ca

 

References


Birks J, Flicker L. Donepezil for mild cognitive impairment. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;3:CD006104.


DeKosky ST, Williamson JD, Fitzpatrick AL, et al. Ginko biloba for prevention of dementia: a randomized controlled trila. JAMA. 2008;300:2306-2308.


Feldman HH, Jacova C. Mild cognitive impairment. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005;13:645-655.


Gauthier S, Reisberg B, Zaudig M, et al. Mild cognitive impairment. Lancet. 2006;367:1262-1270.


Institute for the Study of Aging and International Longevity Center–USA (March 2001). Achieving and Maintaining Cognitive Vitality With Aging: A Workshop Report. New York, NY.


Mild cognitive impairment. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated August 23, 2013. Accessed September 5, 2013.


National Institute on Aging. 2011-2012 Alzheimer's Disease Progress Report. Available at: http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/2011-2012-alzheimers-disease-progress-report. Accessed September 5, 2013.


Petersen RC. Mild cognitive impairment: current research and clinical implications. Semin Neurol. 2007;27.


Petersen RC, Roberts RO, Knopmann DS, et al. Mild cognitive impairment: ten years later. Arch Neurol. 2009;66(12):1447-1455.


Petersen RC, Smith GE, Waring SC, Ivnik RJ, Tangalos EG, Kokmen E. Mild cognitive impairment: clinical characterization and outcome. Archives of Neurology. 1999;56:303-308.

 

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