Munson Health
 
Hyperparathyroidism

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by McCoy K

(Overactive Parathyroid)

 

Risk Factors

Hyperparathyroidism is more common in women, especially after menopause . Other factors that may increase your chance of developing hyperparathyroidism include:
  • Age: older than 50 years
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia
  • Having specific genetic factors that increase your risk
  • Radiation therapy to head or neck during childhood
 

Symptoms

The level of calcium in the blood will determine the symptoms. Symptoms commonly seen with primary hyperparathyroidism include:
  • Constipation
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Headache
  • Loss of appetite
  • Thirst
  • Frequent and sometimes painful urination due to kidney stones
  • Lethargy
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle weakness
  • Joint pain
  • Memory loss
  • Depression
  • Heartburn
  • Back pain
 

Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done.
To measure calcium levels your doctor may ask for:
  • Blood tests—to measure calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, alkaline phosphatase, vitamin D, and PTH, kidney and liver function tests
  • Urine test—a 24-hour urine collection to measure calcium excretion and kidney function (very important test)
Images of the parathyroid gland may be taken with:
  • Neck ultrasound —a test that uses sound waves, not radiation, to detect a large parathyroid tumor (adenoma)
  • Technetium 99m sestamibi scan—a nuclear medicine test that uses safe nuclear molecules to make pictures of the parathyroid glands to help locate a single parathyroid adenoma in primary hyperparathyroidism
Other tests may be done to look for other problems hyperparathyroid may cause:
 

RESOURCES

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
http://www.aace.com/

The Hormone Foundation
http://www.hormone.org/

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders
http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Canada Health Portal
http://chp-pcs.gc.ca/CHP/

Canadian Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism
http://www.endo-metab.ca/

 

References


Hyperparathyroidism. American Academy of Family Physicians website. Available at: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/hyperparathyroidism/treatment.html . Updated November 2010. Accessed June 17, 2013.


Hyperparathyroidism. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php . Updated December 24, 2012. Accessed June 17, 2013.


Silverberg SJ, Bilezikian JP. The diagnosis and management of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab . 2006;2:494-503.


Taniegra E. Hyperparathyroidism. Am Fam Physician . 2004 Jan 15;69(2):333.


11/26/2012 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance : Paik J, Curhan G, Taylor E. Calcium intake and risk of primary hyperparathyroidism in women: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2012;345:e6390

 

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