Munson Health
 
Tobacco Cessation

It’s not easy, but you can quit. It will be good for you and for everyone who loves you. Here’s a little motivation:

Eight Things that Happen When You Quit Smoking

  1. 20 minutes after quitting: Your heart rate and blood pressure drop (Effect of Smoking on Arterial Stiffness and Pulse Pressure Amplification, Mahmud, A, Feely, J. 2003. Hypertension:41:183.)
  2. 12 hours after quitting: The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal (US Surgeon General's Report, 1988, p. 202)
  3. 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting: Your circulation improves and your lung function increases (US Surgeon General's Report, 1990, pp.193, 194,196, 285, 323)
  4. 1 to 9 months after quitting: You cough less, and shortness of breath decreases Cilia (tiny hair-like structures in your lungs) start working normally, moving mucus, cleaning your lungs, and reducing your risk of infection (US Surgeon General's Report, 1990, pp. 285-287, 304)
  5. 1 year after quitting: Your risk of coronary heart disease drops to half that of a smoker's (US Surgeon General's Report, 1990, p. vi)
  6. 5-10 years after quitting: Your stroke risk drops to that of a nonsmoker's. (US Surgeon General's Report, 1990, p. vi)
  7. 10 years after quitting: Your risk of developing cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, cervix, and pancreas decreases (US Surgeon General's Report, 1990, pp. vi, 131, 148, 152, 155, 164,166)
  8. 15 years after quitting: Your risk of coronary heart disease drops to that of a non-smoker's. (US Surgeon General's Report, 1990, p. vi)

Smoking Cessation Resources