Munson Health
 
Dehydration

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by Wood D
 

Risk Factors

Dehydration is more common in children younger than two years and people aged 65 years or older, especially those with chronic illness.
Factors that may increase the risk of dehydration include:
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • High fever
  • Exposure to the heat and sun
  • Excessive exercise, including athletic competitions
  • Living in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • Medications, including diuretics and laxatives
  • Reduced fluid intake due to certain conditions, such as movement problems, mental or memory problems, decreased ability to perceive thirst
  • Fluid imbalance caused by certain conditions, such as diabetes, kidney disease, burns, and infection
 

RESOURCES

American Academy of Family Physicians
http://familydoctor.org

American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.healthychildren.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

About Kids Health
http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

 

References


Dehydration and heat stroke. Wexner Medical Center website. Available at: http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare%5Fservices/emergency%5Fservices/non%5Ftraumatic%5Femergencies/dehydration%5Fheat%5Fstroke/Pages/index.aspx. Accessed December 12, 2013.


Dehydration and hypovolemia in adults. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated December 4, 2013. Accessed December 12, 2013.


Dehydration and hypovolemia in infants and children. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated December 4, 2013. Accessed December 12, 2013.


Rehydration therapy in children. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed . Updated May 13, 2013. Accessed December 12, 2013.

 

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