Munson Health
 
Polymyositis

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by Safer D
 

Treatment

While there is no cure, treatment can improve your muscle strength and function. Talk with your doctor about the best plan for you. Options include:

Medication

Medications to treat polymyositis may include:
  • Corticosteroids to reduce inflammation
  • Topical steroids to treat skin rash
  • Immunosuppresants
IV immunoglobulin therapy is another treatment option. It involves using an IV needle to inject extra immunoglobins (special proteins) into the body. This process may help the immune system function better and reduce inflammation.

Physical Therapy

Your doctor may recommend that you work with a physical therapist to prevent permanent muscle damage. Exercise may include:
  • A regular stretching routine for weakened arms and legs
  • Light strengthening as the pain lessens and function returns

Dietary Changes

Polymyositis can lead to problems with chewing and swallowing. By working with a registered dietitian, you can learn ways to adjust to these changes and get the nutrition that you need.

Speech Therapy

Polymyositis may also cause speech problems. A speech therapist can assess your condition and create a program for you.
 

RESOURCES

American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association
http://www.aarda.org

The Myositis Association
http://www.myositis.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

The Arthritis Society
http://www.arthritis.ca

 

References


Choy EH, Hoogendijk JE, Lecky B, Winer JB, Gordon P. Immunosuppressant and immunomodulatory treatment for dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev . 2009;(4):CD003643.


Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy: treatment. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php . Updated April 7, 2013. Accessed July 31, 2013.


Myositis. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Ortho Info website. Available at: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00198 . Updated July 2007. Accessed July 31, 2013.


Myositis Association. Getting diagnosed. The Myositis Association website. Available at: http://www.myositis.org/learn-about-myositis/diagnosis . Updated March 2012. Accessed July 31, 2013.


Myositis Association. Myositis FAQ. Myositis Association website. Available at: http://www.myositis.org/learn-about-myositis/types-of-myositis . Updated March 2012. Accessed July 31, 2013.


Myositis Association. Treatment. Myositis Association website. Available at: http://www.myositis.org/learn-about-myositis/treatment . Updated March 2012. Accessed July 31, 2013.


NINDS Polymyositis information page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Available at: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/polymyositis/polymyositis.htm . Updated August 26, 2011. Accessed July 31, 2013.


Simply stated: the creatine kinase test. Quest . 2000;7(1).

 

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