Munson Health
 
Right-side Stroke

Back to Document

by Stahl RJ

(Stroke, Right-side; Right Hemisphere Stroke; Stroke, Right Hemisphere)

 

Risk Factors

Certain factors increase your risk of stroke but can not be changed, such as:
  • Race—People of African American, Hispanic, or Asian/Pacific Islander descent are at increased risk.
  • Age: Older than 55 years of age
  • Family history of stroke
Other factors that may increase your risk can be changed such as:
Certain medical condition that can increase your risk of stroke. Management or prevention of these conditions can significantly decrease your risk. Medical conditions include:
Risk factors specific to women include:
  • Previous pre-eclampsia
  • Use of birth control pills, especially if you are over 35 years old and smoke
  • Long-term use of hormone replacement therapy
  • Menopause
  • Pregnancy—due to increased risk of blood clots
 

Treatment

Immediate treatment is needed to:
  • Dissolve or remove a clot causing an ischemic stroke
  • Stop bleeding during a hemorrhagic stroke
Oxygen therapy may be needed.

Medications

For an ischemic stroke, medication may be given to:
  • Dissolve clots and prevent new ones from forming
  • Thin blood
  • Control blood pressure
  • Treat an irregular heart rate
  • Treat high cholesterol
For a hemorrhagic stroke, medication may be given to:
  • Work against any blood-thinning drugs you may regularly take
  • Prevent seizures
  • Reduce how your brain reacts to bleeding
  • Control blood pressure

Surgery

For an ischemic stroke, procedures may be done to:
For a hemorrhagic stroke, the doctor may:

Rehabilitation

A rehabilitation program focuses on:
  • Physical therapy—to regain as much movement as possible
  • Occupational therapy—to assist in everyday tasks and self-care
  • Speech therapy—to improve swallowing and speech challenges
  • Psychological therapy—to help adjust to life after the stroke
 

Prevention

Many of the risk factors for stroke can be changed. Lifestyle changes that can help reduce your chance of getting a stroke include:
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Eat more fruits, vegetables , and whole grains . Limit dietary salt and fat .
  • If you smoke, talk to your doctor about ways to quit.
  • Increase your consumption of fish.
  • Limit alcohol to 1-2 drinks per day.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Check blood pressure frequently . Follow your doctor's advice for keeping it in a safe range.
  • Take aspirin if your doctor says it is safe.
  • Keep chronic medical conditions under control. This includes high cholesterol and diabetes.
  • Talk to your doctor about the use of a statins. These types of drugs may help prevent certain kinds of strokes in some people.
  • Seek medical care if you have symptoms of a stroke, even if symptoms stop.
  • If you use drugs, talk to your doctor about rehabilitation programs.
 

RESOURCES

American Heart Association
http://www.heart.org

National Stroke Association
http://www.stroke.org

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
http://ww2.heartandstroke.ca

Stroke Survivors
Association of Ottawa
http://www.strokesurvivors.ca

 

References


Furie KL, Kasner SE, Adams RJ, et al. Guidelines for the Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Stroke . 2010 October 21. Available at: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/STR.0b013e3181f7d043v1. Updated October 21, 2010. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Hemorrhagic stroke. National Stroke Association website. Available at: http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=HEMSTROKE. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Hemorrhagic strokes (bleeds). American Heart Association American Stroke Association website. Available at: http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/AboutStroke/TypesofStroke/HemorrhagicBleeds/Hemorrhagic-Strokes-Bleeds%5FUCM%5F310940%5FArticle.jsp. Updated November 7, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Intracerebral hemorrhage. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated August 14, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Ischemic strokes (clots). American Heart Association American Stroke Association website. Available at: http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/AboutStroke/TypesofStroke/IschemicClots/Ischemic-Strokes-Clots%5FUCM%5F310939%5FArticle.jsp. Updated November 7, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Long term management of stroke. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated October 28, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Mena F, Fruns M, Contreras A, Soto F, Mena I. Acute brainstem infarct: multidisciplinary management. Alasbimn Journal website. Available at: http://www.alasbimnjournal.cl/revistas/5/mena5.htm. Published October 1999. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Nueroimaging for acute stroke. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated May 15, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Raychev R, Saver JL. Mechanical thrombectomy devices for treatment of stroke. Neurol Clin Practice. 2012;2(3):231-235.


Stroke (acute management). EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated October 24, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.


Subarachnoid hemorrhage. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php. Updated October 14, 2013. Accessed November 18, 2013.


What is stroke? National Stroke Association website. Available at: http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=SYMP. Accessed November 18, 2013.


2/7/2014 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance: Bushnell C, et al. AHA/ASA Guideline for the Prevention of Stroke in Women. Stroke. 2014 Feb 6. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Revision Information