Munson Health
 
Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

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by Stahl RJ

(CTE)

 

Causes

  • A blow or jolt to the head
  • Severe jarring or shaking
  • Abruptly coming to a stop
Over time, these injuries can lead to abnormal groups of tau proteins. These proteins can create tangled masses in the brain. The tangles can block normal brain function. Similar tangles are seen in people with Alzheimer’s disease.
 

Symptoms

Symptoms include:
  • Depression, including feeling suicidal
  • Paranoia
  • Aggression
  • Apathy
  • Irritability
  • Agitation
  • Impulsiveness
  • Poor concentration
  • Memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Poor judgment
  • Tremor
  • Muscle twitching
The symptoms may develop many years after the head injuries.
 

RESOURCES

Boston University Center for Traumatic Brain Injury
http://www.bu.edu/cste/

Sports Legacy Institute
http://www.sportslegacy.org/

 

CANADIAN RESOURCES

Brain Injury Association of Alberta
http://www.biaa.ca/

Ontario Brain Injury Association
http://www.obia.on.ca/

 

References


Blast anatomy—chronic traumatic encephalopathy in military vets. Alzheimer Research Forum website. Available at: http://www.alzforum.org/new/detail.asp?id=3159. Published May 18, 2012. Accessed May 29, 2012.


Chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Sports Legacy Institute website. Available at: http://www.sportslegacy.org/cte-concussions/what-is-cte/. Accessed May 29, 2012.


Kowall N. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and its connection with ALS. US Department of Veterans Affairs website. Available at: http://www.va.gov/RAC-GWVI/docs/Minutes%5Fand%5FAgendas/Minutes%5FNov2010%5FAppendixA%5FPresentation7.pdf. Published November 2010. Accessed May 29, 2012.


LaVecchia F. Traumatic brain injury. Indian Health Service website. Available at: http://www.ihs.gov/suicidepreventionsummit/documents/TraumaBrainInjuryLaVecchiaPresentation.pdf. Accessed May 29, 2012.


McKee A, Cantu R, Nowinski C, et al. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in athletes: progressive tauopathy following repetitive head injury. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2009; 68(7):709-735.


Moderate to severe traumatic head injury. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/. Updated April 5, 2010. Accessed May 29, 2012.


Navarro R. Protective equipment and prevention of concussion—what is the evidence. Sports Physical Therapy Section website. Available at: http://www.spts.org/assets/files/CSMR%20Concussion%20equipment.pdf. Published 2011. Accessed May 29, 2012.


NINDS Encephalopathy information page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Available at: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/encephalopathy/encephalopathy.htm. Updated November 9, 2010. Accessed May 29, 2012.


Prevention: What Can I do to Help Prevent Concussion and other forms of TBI? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/prevention.html. Updated May 16, 2012. Accessed May 29, 2012.


Traumatic brain injury: hope through research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Available at: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/tbi/detail%5Ftbi.htm#193693218. Updated May 14, 2012. Accessed May 29, 2012.


What is CTE? Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy website. Available at: http://www.bu.edu/cste/about/what-is-cte/. Accessed May 29, 2012.

 

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